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Archive for the ‘Lists’ Category

Mindset List for the Class of 2019

In College Students, Education, Lists, Malavenda, New Year, Pablo Malavenda on August 18, 2015 at 11:55 am

The Beloit College
Mindset List for the Class of 2019


Students heading into their first year of college this year are mostly 18 and were born in 1997. Among those who have never been alive in their lifetimes are Princess Diana, Notorious B.I.G., Jacques Cousteau, and Mother Teresa. Joining them in the world the year they were born were Dolly the sheep, The McCaughey septuplets, and Michael “Prince” Jackson Jr.


Since they have been on the planet:class_of_2019_tile_coaster

  1. Hybrid automobiles have always been mass produced.
  2. Google has always been there, in its founding words, “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible.”
  3. They have never licked a postage stamp.
  4. Email has become the new “formal” communication, while texts and tweets remain enclaves for the casual.
  5. Four foul-mouthed kids have always been playing in South Park.
  6. Hong Kong has always been under Chinese rule.
  7. They have grown up treating Wi-Fi as an entitlement.
  8. The NCAA has always had a precise means to determine a national champion in college football.
  9. The announcement of someone being the “first woman” to hold a position has only impressed their parents.
  10. Charlton Heston is recognized for waving a rifle over his head as much as for waving his staff over the Red Sea.
  11. Color photos have always adorned the front page of The New York Times.
  12. Ellis Island has always been primarily in New Jersey.
  13. “No means no” has always been morphing, slowly, into “only yes means yes.”
  14. Cell phones have become so ubiquitous in class that teachers don’t know which students are using them to take notes and which ones are planning a party.
  15. The Airport in Washington, D.C., has always been Reagan National Airport.
  16. Their parents have gone from encouraging them to use the Internet to begging them to get off of it.
  17. If you say “around the turn of the century,” they may well ask you, “which one?”
  18. They have avidly joined Harry Potter, Ron, and Hermione as they built their reading skills through all seven volumes.
  19. Attempts at human cloning have never been federally funded but do require FDA approval.
  20. “Crosstown Classic” and the “Battle of the Bay” have always been among the most popular interleague rivalries in Major League Baseball.
  21. Carry Me Back to Old Virginny has never been the official song of the Virginia Commonwealth.
  22. Phish Food has always been available from Ben and Jerry.
  23. Kyoto has always symbolized inactivity about global climate change.
  24. When they were born, cell phone usage was so expensive that families only used their “bag phones,” usually in cars, for emergencies.
  25. The therapeutic use of marijuana has always been legal in a growing number of American states.
  26. The eyes of Texas have never looked upon The Houston Oilers.
  27. Teachers have always had to insist that term papers employ sources in addition to those found online.
  28. In a world of DNA testing, the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington has never included a Vietnam War veteran “known only to God.”
  29. Playhouse Disney was a place where they could play growing up.
  30. Surgeons have always used “super glue” in the operating room.
  31. Fifteen nations have always been constructing the International Space Station.
  32. The Lion King has always been on Broadway.
  33. Phoenix Lights is a series of UFO sightings, not a filtered cigarette.
  34. Scotland and Wales have always had their own parliaments and assemblies.
  35. At least Mom and Dad had their new Nintendo 64 to help them get through long nights sitting up with the baby.
  36. First Responders have always been heroes.
  37. Sir Paul and Sir Elton have always been knights of the same musical roundtable.
  38. CNN has always been available en Español.
  39. Heaven’s Gate has always been more a trip to Comet Hale-Bopp and less a film flop.
  40. Splenda has always been a sweet option in the U.S.
  41. The Atlanta Braves have always played at Turner Field.
  42. Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic have always been members of NATO.
  43. Humans have always had implanted radio frequency ID chips—slightly larger than a grain of rice.
  44. TV has always been in such high definition that they could see the pores of actors and the grimaces of quarterbacks.
  45. Jones and Mr. Smith have always been Men in Black, not their next-door neighbors.
  46. Their proud parents recorded their first steps on camcorders, mounted on their shoulders like bazookas.
  47. They had no idea how fortunate they were to enjoy the final four years of Federal budget surpluses.
  48. Amoco gas stations have steadily vanished from the American highway.
  49. Vote-by-mail has always been the official way to vote in Oregon.
  50. …and there has always been a Beloit College Mindset List.

PLUS: A Little Millennial Jargon 

In fairness to the class of 2019 the following are a few of the expressions from their culture that will baffle their parents, older friends, and teachers. They might even baffle YOU.  (You can find translations further down.)

  1. They need to plan ahead so they don’t find themselves “dankrupt.”
  2.  A heavy dose of “Natty Light” has always caught up with them in the morning.As long as they can find a ballpoint pen they can use their “redneck teleprompter.” 
  3. As long as they can find a ballpoint pen they can use their “redneck teleprompter.” 
  4. “Smartphone shuffles” have always slowed down traffic between classes. 
  5. “Vatican Roulette” has always been risky but acceptable. 
  6. A significant other who is a bit “too Yoko Ono” has always created tension.  
  7. “Quiche” has everything to do with hot and nothing to do with food.
  8. “Trolling” innocents on social media has always been uncharitable. 
  9. They’ll know better than to text their professors “TL DR” about assignments
  10. Slurring “textroverts” have always been a fact of social life.” 

 And Last, Your Personal Explainer

Baffled by the Millennial jargon you’ve just read? Feeling old? Here’s a glossary that will end your bewilderment and make you feel hip!

1. They need to plan ahead so they don’t find themselves “dankrupt.”

  • One of a variety of painful declarations that we are out of weed

 2. A heavy dose of “Natty Light” has always caught up with them in the morning.

  • It may taste great and be less filling, but there are limits.

3. As long as they can find a ballpoint pen they can use their “redneck teleprompter.” 

  • The bigger the back of your hand, the more notes you can include, but don’t get caught looking.

4. “Smartphone shuffles” have always slowed down traffic between classes. 

  • One can avoid all eye contact as one moves through the madding texting crowd.

5. “Vatican Roulette” has always been risky but acceptable. 

  • If you’ve got rhythm and like your planning natural, then Vatican Roulette is the game for you.

6. A significant other who is a bit “too Yoko Ono” has always created tension.  

  • A partner too hard to handle…hard for your friends to compete with perfection

7. “Quiche” has everything to do with hot and nothing to do with food.

  • Turn down the heat. Some people are just so hot they enhance the appetite.

8. “Trolling” innocents on social media has always been uncharitable. 

  • Cynical and bullying attacks on happy campers, preserved on the internet, may come back to haunt you

9. They’ll know better than to text their professors “TL DR” about assignments

  • …and just hope their professor doesn’t scribble back to them, about their own papers: “TOO LONG: DIDN”T READ.”

10. Slurring “textroverts” have always been a fact of social life.

  • If you’re too drunk to say it face to face, you probably should wait until morning before you start texting. 

The Beloit College Mindset List, which this year is as old as the entering students themselves, is created by Ron Nief, Emeritus Director of Public Affairs; Tom McBride, Emeritus Professor of English; and Charles Westerberg. Additional items on the list as well as commentaries and guides are found at www.beloit.edu/mindset and www.themindsetlist.com. Regular updates and discussions are on Facebook and Twitter (@MindsetList).

***

Copyright© 2015 Beloit College

Mindset List is a registered trademark

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Pinterest, I’m Outnumbered

In Books, Lists, Malavenda, marketing, Men, Pablo Malavenda, Pinterest, social media, Survivor, Uncategorized on April 13, 2012 at 11:41 am

Pinterest


Recently I raised my bushy man eyebrows at the latest news about Pinterest.  The media has reported that 90% of the Pinterest users are women – and then there’s me.  On Pinterest, I’m Outnumbered! Personally I feel like the luckiest guy on the inter-webs because the odds are in my favor (JK).  For me though it is just one more time where I find myself surrounded by women and quite OK with it.  When I was growing up, the men in my family were the ones in the kitchen.  Not that the women in my family didn’t cook but the men felt just as comfortable in the kitchen cooking the Sunday family feast as did the women.  In high school, when given a choice of elective classes, I wanted to be with the women so I chose “sewing” and “cooking” classes over shop and wood-working. In college after a failed attempt at chemistry I ended up in psychology with a majority of women.  And today, you can find me in the kitchen, doing the weekly grocery shopping, and more likely to bake cookies for the softball team than coaching the team (which my wife does willingly and well).  So it was not much of a surprise to me that I am outnumbered 9 to 1 on Pinterest — and surrounded by women.

I do quite a bit of consulting on social media, communications and marketing; and therefore, explore most of the new emerging sites push pinlike Pinterest. Similar to Twitter (and years ago with MySpace), I did not really see the value in Pinterest at first. The main reason I was drawn to Pinterest was to cross-market my content on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and WordPress. I soon realized that it is quite addictive. I am intrigued and slightly obsessed with Lists.  Pinterest is an ideal platform for list-o-maniacs.  Within a short time, I created boards based on lists like: My Favorite Books, Celebrities I’ve Met, People I Admire, Favorite Places in NYC, Cars I’ve Owned, etc.  In some cases I created the lists from PC Pop blog posts of mine.  This is a great way to get started on Pinterest with minimal effort.

What I have found from my limited use of Pinterest is that it is useful for collectors (and hoarders).  If you have a number of recipes that you refer to often online, Pinterest gives you a place to collect them, store them, share them, and easily retrieve them whenever you need them.  My favorite guacamole is Alton Brown’s recipe which is posted somewhere on the Food Network website.  Each time I need it, I have to do a Google search and hopefully find it.  Well, now, Pinterest allows me to create a “recipe” board and pin Alton’s guacamole recipe – very convenient.  Pinterest has also become my “go to” web-place to search for recipes.  If you search Pinterest, you get quite a few hits and the results have photos and reviews right there at your finger-tips.

I have noticed though that there are a gazillion blogs about food, and these bloggers repost other people’s recipes.  They credit the original chef and link to the original post of the recipe but it is bit annoying.  It’s annoying because you may have to click through a Pixar's Cars 2 - Mater Sandwichcouple of blog posts before you find the original recipe.  The other thing I have noticed is there are a lot of very ambitious DIY bloggers who share their latest theme-related, holiday craft project to do with your kids.  These craft projects are beautiful and inspiring but how in the world would anyone (especially a parent) find the time to do all of these things with your kids.  Personally I struggle getting the Pumpkins carved by Halloween, Easter eggs colored before Easter Sunday, getting the Christmas tree up soon after Thanksgiving (and putting it all away before Valentine’s Day), and getting food on the table for dinner every night.  Making my sandwiches look like Mater from Pixar’s Cars is not a top priority for me most nights.  You have to be careful to not let Pinterest make you feel like a neglectful, under-achieving parent. That being said, our new favorite potato dish, baked ham glaze, and Irish soda bread came from Pinterest.

Similar to Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and my blog, Pinterest gives you great joy when someone follows your boards or “repins” one of your pins. I recently pinned a recipe for cinnamon sweet potatoes and was on cloud 9 because it got close to 100 repins.  Sounds silly but you know you’ve been there.  But seriously, like any social media and marketing site, it only has an impact if it is engaging, people are following you, you’re getting comments on your pins and most importantly with Pinterest, your pins are getting “repinned.”  To make this happen you have to explore other people’s boards, follow others, comment on pins, and repin other’s posts.  You also need to add pins regularly.

Pinterest logo labelLastly, Pinterest is a great place to practice cross-marketing.  If you have a collection of videos on your YouTube channel and several posts on your blog, Pinterest boards give you a place to market and share them.  Create a board on Pinterest with a theme and pin your videos and blog posts.  When your Pinterest followers click on your pin it takes them directly to your blog post.  With videos, it plays the video on Pinterest and allows you to click through to YouTube and watch it there as well.  Another way to increase traffic back to Pinterest is to create a hyperlink within your photos on your blog to a board on Pinterest.  If you click on the photos in my blogs about Survivor Leadership, you will be directed to a board on my Pinterest site called Survivor Leadership.  This board contains all of the photos from all of my blogs post about Survivor.  The pins on this board then link my Pinterest followers to my blog posts.  Cross-marketing is the best way to increase traffic across all of the platforms you’re using.

More and more people are finding Pinterest and joining the fun.  Pinterest’s numbers have exploded in early 2012.  Pinterest is nowhere near the world domination status of Facebook or Twitter. But another measure of success is the amount of media attention a site is getting – and in this category Pinterest is winning the race.  Pinterest is dominating the media lately.  I hope I have given you some ideas in this post on how you can join the party and use Pinterest to increase your presence online.  You will be sucked in initially and spend hours exploring, creating boards and pinning.  (At one point, I thought I needed a Pintervention.) Each day there are more and more companies, politicians and universities jumping on board but for now it is just me and all of these women.  And just like high school cooking class, I’m enjoying being outnumbered and part of the 10%.  Check out my boards, repin my pins and follow me.



Read other PC Pop blog posts about Social Media & Marketing:


Read other PC Pop blog posts about my issues with being a man (and a feminist):


Story Book Leadership — Book List

In Big Bird, Books, Cat in Hat, Children's Literature, College Students, creativity, Dr. Seuss, Group Dynamics, Harold & the Purple Crayon, Leader, Leadership, Lists, Literacy Month, Lorax, Malavenda, Maurice Sendak, Pablo Malavenda, Pop Culture, Purdue, Shel Silverstein, Story Book Leadership, Theodor Geisel, UConn, Uncategorized, William Steig, Yertle the Turtle on March 6, 2012 at 7:29 am

stack of children's books

I have been teaching LEADERSHIP to college students for close to 25 years and have been using Children’s literature for over 15 years. When attending retreats, workshops and conferences, adults including college students love to regress.  The joy on their faces when you pull out a children’s story book is priceless.  Once they realize you are serious about using a children’s book to teach leadership, students really get into it. The discussion is lively, fun, and meaningful. It is magical. (Read the entire story in the PCPop blog post: Story Book Leadership – Teaching College Students Using Kiddie Lit.)

If you too want to use Story Book Leadership techniques with your students, find out how to get started by reading the PCPop blog post: Story Book Leadership – Getting Started. Selecting the perfect book is one of the first steps in the process of using Story Book Leadership.

children readingI encourage you to select one of your favorite’s from your childhood — your passion for the book will add genuine excitement to your presentation.  I would love it if you also went to your local library and bookstores (locally owned, of course), sat on the floor over the course of a few months, and discover and rediscover the wonderful world of Children’s literature.  You can learn more about my story by reading the PCPop blog post: Story Book Leadership – Teaching College Students Using Kiddie Lit. But in case you don’t have time for that level of commitment, a list of some of my favorites are as follows:

  • A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein
  • Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith ViorstAlexander
  • Alexander, Who Used to be Rich Last Sunday by Judith Viorst
  • Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish
  • Bartholomew and the Oobleck by Dr. Seuss
  • Benjie by Joan Lexau
  • Berenstain Bears and Too Much Pressure by Jan & Stan Berenstain
  • Big Bad Bruce by Bill Peet
  • Brave Irene by William Steig
  • But Not Billy by Charlotte Zolotow
  • Click, Clack, Moo: Cows that Type by Doreen Cronin
  • Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are? by Dr. Seuss
  • Eli by Bill Peet
  • Ella by Bill Peet
  • Farewell to Shady Glade by Bill Peet
  • Five Minutes’ Peace by Jill Murphy
  • Frederick by Leo Lionni
  • Gertrude McFuzz by Dr. SeussBig Bad Bruce
  • Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson
  • Hector, the Accordion-Nosed Dog by John Stadler
  • I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today by Dr. Seuss
  • I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew by Dr. Seuss
  • I Saw Esau by Iona & Peter Opie
  • If I Were in Charge of the World by Judith Viorst
  • I’m Mad at You! by William Cole
  • Ira Says Goodbye by Bernard Waber
  • Ira Sleeps Over by Bernard Waber
  • It’s Not Fair by Charlotte Zolotow
  • Jennifer and Josephine by Bill Peet
  • King Looie Katz by Dr. Seuss
  • Let’s Be Enemies by Janice May Udry
  • Little Toot by Hardie Gramatky
  • My First Hanukkah Book by Aileen Fisher
  • My First Kwanzaa Book by Deborah M. Newton Chocolate
  • My Mama Says There Aren’t Any Zombies, Ghosts, Vampires, Creatures, Deamons, Monsters, Fiends, Goblins, or Things by Judith Viorst
  • Nobody is Perfick by Bernard WaberHarold and the Purple Crayon
  • Nobody Stole the Pie by Sonia Levitin
  • Oh, the Places You Will Go by Dr. Seuss
  • Oh, the Thinks You Can Think! by Dr. Seuss
  • On Beyond Zebra by Dr. Seuss
  • A Person is Many Wonderful, Strange Things by Marsha Sinetar
  • Play Ball Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish
  • Pooh: Oh, Bother! No One’s Listening by Betty Birney
  • Pooh: Oh, Bother! Somebody’s Grumpy by Betty Birney
  • Rosie and Michael by Judith Viorst
  • Seven Candles for Kwanzaa by Andrea Pinkney
  • Sneetches by Dr. Seuss
  • Spinky Sulks by William Steig
  • Tacky the Penguin by Helen LesterFrederick
  • The Ant and the Elephant by Bill Peet
  • The Art Lesson by Tomie dePaola
  • The Big Bragg by Dr. Seuss
  • The Butter Battle Book by Dr. Seuss
  • The Chanukkah Tree by Eric Kimmel
  • The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein
  • The Glunk That Got Thunk by Dr. Seuss
  • The Gnats of Knotty Pine by Bill Peet
  • The Hating Book by Charlotte Zolotow
  • The Island of Skog by Steven Kellogg
  • The King’s Stilts by Dr. Seuss
  • The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper
  • The Lorax by Dr. Seuss
  • The Missing Piece by Shel Silverstein
  • The Missing Piece Meets the Big O by Shel Silverstein
  • The Painter and the Wild Swans by Claude Clements
  • The Whingdingdilly by Bill PeetYellow and Pink
  • The Wump World by Bill Peet
  • The Zax by Dr. Seuss
  • Timmy Needs a Thinking Cap by Charlotte Steiner
  • What Was I Scared Of? by Dr. Seuss
  • When the Wind Stops by Charlotte Zolotow
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein
  • Who Wants a Cheap Rhinoceros? by Shel Silverstein
  • William’s Doll by Charlotte Zolotow
  • Yellow and Pink by William Steig
  • Yertle the Turtle by Dr. Seuss

Yertle the TurtlePlease follow PCPop with Pablo to read the series of blog posts featuring many of the Children’s books listed above starting with one of my favorites, Harold & the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson. If you too want to use Story Book Leadership techniques with your students, find out how to get started by reading the PCPop blog post: Story Book Leadership – Getting Started.


For more information on Story Book Leadership, read the PC Pop posts as follows:


To enjoy my Pinterest board on Story Book Leadership, click here.

Children Reading

Please suggest new books for the list — the list is a work in progress and will be updated as needed. What Children’s Books inspire you and would be perfect for teaching LEADERSHIP…and why? I would love to hear your suggestions and stories.

Leadership Books – Recommended Reading

In Bennis, Blanchard, Books, Burns, Covey, DePree, Exploring Leadership, Group Dynamics, Komives, Leader, Leadership, Lists, Malavenda, Nance Lucas, Pablo Malavenda, Timothy McMahon, Uncategorized, Wooden on June 18, 2011 at 10:01 pm

I am often asked “what’s a good leadership book?” I originally created this list for a keynote entitled Leadership Books that Student Leaders Should Read and have kept it updated since based on new discoveries and suggestions from others. If you have searched the web for leadership books or browse your local bookstore for books about leadership, you know that there are lots and lots of leadership books.  But most of them are not worth your time.  The books below are ones that have inspired me with new ideas, practical methods, and contain important elements of leadership like inclusion, ethics, team-work, service, creativity and social justice. This is not a comprehensive list but rather and guide for getting started.  The second section is called Leadership Light. These titles are intended to re-energize you or be focus on one specific topic.

Leadership Books:

  • Bennis, Warren G. (2009). 4th Edition. On Becoming A Leader. New York: Basic Books.
  • Burns, James MacGregor. (1978). Leadership. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Burns, James MacGregor. (2003). Transforming Leadership: A New Pursuit of Happiness. New York: Atlantic Monthly Press.
  • Collins, James C. (2001). Good to Great. New York: HarperCollins.
  • Covey, Stephen R. (1992). Principle-centered Leadership. New York: Fireside.
  • Covey, Stephen R. (1989). The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. New York: Fireside.
  • Gardner, Howard (1995). Leading Minds: An Anatomy of Leadership. New York: Basic Books.
  • Gardner, John W. (1990). On Leadership. New York: The Free Press.
  • Greenleaf, Robert K. (2002). Servant Leadership: A Journey Into the Nature of Legitimate Power and Greatness – 25th Anniversary Edition. Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press.
  • Harari, Oren. (2002). The Leadership Secrets of Colin Powell. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • Hersey, P., & Blanchard, K. (1977) 6th Edition. Management of Organizational Behavior: Utilizing Human Resources. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
  • Komives, Susan R., Lucas, Nance, & McMahon, Timothy R. (2007). 2nd Edition. Exploring Leadership for College Students Who Want to Make a Difference. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • Kotter, John P. (1996) Leading Change. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press.
  • Kouzes, James M. & Posner, Barry Z. (2011). Credibility: How Leaders Gain and Lose It, Why People Demand It. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • Kouzes, James M. & Posner, Barry Z. (2008). 4th Edition. The Leadership Challenge. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • Kouzes, James M. & Posner, Barry Z. (2008). The Student Leadership Challenge: Five Practices for Exemplary Leaders. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • Lencioni, Patrick. (1998). The Five Temptations of a CEO. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.
  • White, B. Joseph (2006). The Nature of Leadership: Reptiles, Mammals, and the Challenge of Becoming a Great Leader. New York: American Management Association.
  • Wooden, John, Jamison, Steve (2005). Wooden on Leadership. New York: McGraw-Hill.
Leadership Light:
  • Byham, William (1988). Zapp! The Lightning of Empowerment. New York: Fawcett Columbine.
  • DePree, Max (1989). Leadership is an Art. New York: Dell Publishing.
  • DePree, Max (1992). Leadership Jazz. New York: Dell Publishing.
  • Farber, Steve, Kelly, Matthew (2009). Greater Than Yourself: the Ultimate Lesson of True Leadership. New York: Crown Publishing.
  •  Hoff, Benjamin. (1982). The Tao of Pooh. New York: Dutton.
  • Johnson, Spencer & Blanchard, Kenneth H. (1993). The One Minute Manager. New York: Berkley.
  • Johnson, Spencer & Blanchard, Kenneth H. (1998). Who Moved My Cheese?: An Amazing Way to Deal With Change in Your Work and in Your Life. New York: Putnam.
  • Lundin, Stephen C. (2000). Fish! A Remarkable Way to Boost Morale and Improve Results. New York: Hyperion.
  • Ruiz, Don Miguel. (1997). The Four Agreements. San Rafael, California: Amber-Allen Publishing.
You will either be led or lead in every aspect of your life from work to school to your family or your neighborhood.  Leadership needs to be thoughtful and leaders must practice, practice, practice.  Taking risks and making mistakes is a critical part of learning and developing your personal leadership skills.

I hope this list gets you motivated to learn more about leadership, be a leader in your community, and become a role model for other aspiring and emerging leaders.

Leader Up!

Books – 15 That Have Influenced My Life

In Books, Lists, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, Pop Culture on June 18, 2011 at 9:26 pm

These are the 15 books that have been influential in my life.  Hopefully you will get a better idea of who i am by seeing which books I love and keep going back to.

  1. The Autobiography of Malcolm X – As told to Alex Haley
  2. Black Like Me – John Howard Griffin
  3. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings – Maya Angelou
  4. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn – Betty Smith
  5. She’s Come Undone – Wally Lamb
  6. Fahrenheit 451 – Ray Bradbury
  7. Nickel and Dimed – Barbara Ehrenreich
  8. Harold & the Purple Crayon – Crocket Johnson
  9. The Ransom of Red Chief – O. Henry
  10. High Fidelity – Nick Hornby
  11. The Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
  12. The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald
  13. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
  14. The Stranger – Albert Camus
  15. Harry Potter series – JK Rowling

Let me know what you think.  Do you agree with any? Would you add one or two?  What are your 15? Keep reading; encourage others to read; read to others.