P.C.Pop with Pablo

Archive for the ‘Faith & Leadership’ Category

Faith and Leadership – Action is the Answer not Pity

In Faith & Leadership, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, Philosophy on March 9, 2014 at 12:20 pm

My Lenten Reflection


stmatthew

I am blessed to be in a position to serve others through my work with St. Thomas Aquinas Center and with the Lafayette Urban Ministry. I am also blessed with a close and loving family who I adore and work very hard every moment of every day to be a worthy husband, a devoted father, and a caring son. A day does not go by that I do not reflect on Matthew 25:31-46 and the parable of the sheep and goats.


And the king will say to them in reply, ‘Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.’


At St. Tom’s my work behind the scenes is quite fulfilling. One aspect of my role at St. Tom’s is overseeing the Mother Teresa Fund. The Mother Teresa Fund is an emergency financial assistance program that offers a safety net for families in crisis. Each day I listen to stories of hard working families who need a small bit of assistance. I am humbled by their strength and persistence in a time of great crisis in their lives. Such a little bit of kindness and a small amount of money from St. Tom’s is saving lives, enriching spirits, and giving hope.

In my work with LUM, my primary role is to promote the various services and programs offered by LUM through social media and traditional marketing. Whether it is offering safe housing for the homeless, emergency financial assistance through the LUM Good Samaritan Fund, educational enrichment programs for children through LUM Camp, the After School Program, the Achieve high school program or the 5th Quarter Summer Learning program; or food assistance through the St. John’s/LUM Food Pantry – LUM gives me an opportunity to serve families in our community in transition or crisis. Promoting such worthy initiatives is a joy.


Who am I to judge? How may I serve more? Am I really worthy enough?


I am reminded every day that I am merely a sinner but I have been given gifts from the Holy Spirit and called to serve others. AndThe_Inspiration_of_Saint_Matthew_by_Caravaggio when I serve, I must not judge and I must always try to do more – to be more worthy and more grateful for how “rich” I am. I can and do pray for others less fortunate than I – but my prayers must be followed by action – otherwise I am only offering sympathy and pity to others which is not helpful to anyone. God wants us to serve others as Jesus was called to do. Forgive others as God has and stop punishing others for their past or current mistakes or misfortunes.

On a broader level, we must not judge other “nations” – we must not just hope and pray that the world will get better – we must stand up for others, speak up when we see injustices, advocate for those who are marginalized or disenfranchised, fight for peace, and take action to make positive change for EACH member of our communities not just the majority.


He will answer them, ‘Amen, I say to you, what you did NOT do for one of these least ones, you did NOT do for me.’


Every day I strive to be a good role model for others especially my children. Modeling that we must not only pray for others but we must also be servants – serving and giving without fear, without judgment, without hesitation. We must not let our prejudice and ignorance stop us from serving others. We have all needed the help of others – and seen friends and family members struggle due to unemployment, addiction, incarceration, relationship problems, death, and illness. If we turn our back on those in the most desperate need – it is neither neighborly nor Christian. We must give of our time, give from our gifts and talents, and give monetary gifts and from our material possessions – our tithing. And when we serve we must do so with grace, empathy, and humility — giving others hope and offering love and dignity.

Matthew 25 gives me a guidepost to live my life – and I might get it right 75% of the time. The important thing is that I am reflecting each day on how I can be a servant in some way, to someone each and every day.

And in reality – if I am honest with myself – my service is saving and enriching my soul as much as it is assisting others.



Matthew 25:31-46


The Judgment of the Nations. *31f “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, he will sit upon his glorious throne, 32g and all the nations* will be assembled before him. And he will separate them one from another, as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 He will place the sheep on his right and the goats on his left. 34 Then the king will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. 35h For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, a stranger and you welcomed me, 36 naked and you clothed me, ill and you cared for me, in prison and you visited me.’ 37 Then the righteous* will answer him and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? 38 When did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? 39 When did we see you ill or in prison, and visit you?’ 40i And the king will say to them in reply, ‘Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.’ 41*j Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you accursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42k For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, 43a stranger and you gave me no welcome, naked and you gave me no clothing, ill and in prison, and you did not care for me.’ 44* Then they will answer and say, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or ill or in prison, and not minister to your needs?’ 45 He will answer them, ‘Amen, I say to you, what you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for me.’ 46l And these will go off to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.”



About the author


For those of you who know me — I must explain why I, of all people, am writing a Lenten Reflection. I have been a Catholic my entire life and love it. But I have never considered myself a pious or even slightly religious person. A couple of years ago when my pastor asked me to use my “gifts” to serve the church, I was honored. Subsequently I have facilitated several parish staff retreats, presented workshops on leadership for parishioners, and developed a capstone leadership program for college Catholic seniors. My pastor must have been pleased with my work and confident in my leadership training, organizational development skills, and work ethic — because three months ago he offered me a job (paid) with the church as their “parish administrator.” I have enjoyed serving my church and assisting my pastor in advancing the ministries, improving the operations, and creating a healthy work environment. What I was not looking forward to or at all comfortable with was the “religious” part of the job. Our weekly staff meeting often consist of reflecting on the readings and Gospel for the upcoming weekend — yikes. This was the epitome of being “outside of my comfort zone.” To my surprise, I get it — and more importantly no one chuckles when I offer my opinion. Then I found out that every church staff member must contribute to the daily Lenten Reflection Booklet. I reached a new level of anxiety — but I faced my fear, was the first one to sign up, and submitted my reflection early. Part of my strategy for signing up first was that I was able to select Matthew 25 — a reading that I have come to know through my work over the past couple of years with the Lafayette Urban Ministry. So — that is my story. I hope this helps put the above reflection into some perspective — and gives you something meaningful to ponder during the Lenten season.


Please let me know what you think. Thanks.


Advertisements

Purdue Student Leaders attend ESTEEM Capstone Conference

In ESTEEM, Faith & Leadership, Leader, Leadership, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, Purdue, Uncategorized on May 19, 2013 at 10:50 am

 


esteem logo


May 19, 2013 (New Haven) Purdue students enrolled in the Boiler ESTEEM program at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Center at Purdue attended a national leadership conference at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

During a three-day weekend in April, the future leaders of the Catholic Church gathered to share ideas, learn new skills, network, IMG_6443develop professionally, grow spiritually, and create a shared vision for engaging in the Church as leaders now and forever. The event was the 2013 ESTEEM Capstone Conference, a three-day Catholic student leader gathering at the Saint Thomas More Center at Yale.

ESTEEM Capstone Conference is an annual opportunity for Catholic college student leaders who participate all year long in their campus ESTEEM programs to meet each other and reaffirm the vision of this innovative initiative. The three-day conference began with the students from each school presenting the highlights of their yearlong ESTEEM programs. This created an environment of sharing best practices that carried over into the evening.

On the second day, the conversation continued with two alumni from past ESTEEM programs sharing stories of their personal journeys of getting engaged as leaders in the church after graduation. Next, Kerry Robinson, the executive director of the National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management shared the history and vision of ESTEEM. After an inspiring morning, the students participated in IMG_6462a participatory exercise of discovering their own gifts through taking and discussing the DiSC Evaluation.

The afternoon also included a keynote by author and Catholic TV commentator, Matt Weber. Matt Weber, through personal stories and humor, connected with the students and gave them strategies to stay excited and engaged in the issues and advancements of the Catholic Church. The rest of the afternoon allowed student leaders to meet in small groups to develop new ideas for the national ESTEEM initiative as well as the ESTEEM programs on their own campuses. The second day of the conference ended in celebration. Bishop Peter A. Rosazza led the delegation in Mass in the Saint Thomas More Chapel followed by formal dinner. Following dinner, most delegates took advantage of being on the Yale campus by attending a ballet performance. Networking and fellowship continued after the performance and into the evening.


IMG_6545


During the final morning of the conference on Sunday, the delegates participated in a lively brainstorming session on the key elements of the ESTEEM curriculum. By the end of the conference, the young Catholic leaders were even more equipped to strengthen their campus’ ESTEEM program and more confident to become true leaders in their Church. The ESTEEM advisory committee announced that there are plans to expand ESTEEM to more schools, to create a means for ESTEEM alumni to stay connected with each other and another Capstone Conference at Yale would be scheduled for next spring. A couple of examples that the conference was a success are students from Michigan State and Purdue have arranged to collaborate on a service project next year and the ESTEEM Facebook page exploded with posts shortly after the conference ended from conference delegates from the various schools.


ESTEEM is a nationwide program to develop the leadership skills of young Catholic students at private, Catholic, and secular colleges and universities across the nation. An initiative of the National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management and Saint Thomas More Catholic Chapel & Center at Yale, ESTEEM (Engaging Students to Enliven the Ecclesial Mission) focuses on the core competencies of spirituality, education, community and service. Employing a multifaceted approach, ESTEEM provides college students with the inspiration and tools for deeper engagement in the life and witness of the Church.


The ESTEEM campuses are as follows:

  • Michigan State University
  • Ohio State University
  • Purdue University
  • Robert Morris University
  • Stanford University
  • Texas Technical University
  • University of California at Berkeley
  • University of California at Los Angeles
  • Yale University

St. Thomas Aquinas - PurdueThese future leaders of the Church from St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Center at Purdue were sent home from the ESTEEM Capstone Conference with renewed focus and determination that will surely have an impact on the Catholic world. They are not only committed to becoming Church leaders after graduation but also to sharing their experiences with Boiler ESTEEM with the current parishioners in hopes that the program will grow at Purdue.

The Boiler ESTEEM students are as follows:

  • Maria Lina Andvik (graduate student in Psychology from Bergen, Norway)
  • Tim Brown (senior in Computer Engineering from Kokomo, Indiana)
  • Hannah R Burgess (senior in General Health Sciences/Pre-Medicine from Jasper, Indiana)
  • Juan A. Crespo (senior in Atmospheric Science from South Bend, Indiana)
  • Marie-Catherine Dube (junior in Industrial Design from Goose Creek, South Carolina)
  • Mark Hiew (doctorate student in Veterinary medicine from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
  • Benjamin J Horstman (senior in Nuclear Engineering from Lafayette, Indiana)
  • Heather E Keegan (first-year Pharmacy doctorate student from Eldersburg, Maryland)
  • Alexander Kosiak (junior in Biochemistry from Westfield, Indiana)
  • Anne E Krasniak (first-year Pharmacy doctorate student from Owego, New York)


Contacts:


Fr. Patrick Baikauskas, OP
Pastor, Director of Campus Ministry
E-mail: fatherpatrick@boilercatholics.org
St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Center at Purdue
Tel: 765-743-0426
 



Katie McKenna
E-mail: katie.mckenna@nlrcm.org
Communications and Development Officer & Program Coordinator for ESTEEM (Engaging Students to Enliven the Ecclesial Mission)


Kerry Robinson
E-mail: kerry.robinson@nlrcm.org
Executive Director


National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management
1350 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Suite 825
Washington, DC 20036
Tel: 202-223-8962
Fax: 202-296-9295


####


This post was recently published in current issue (May 19, 2013) of The Catholic Moment – Serving the Diocese of Lafayette-in-Indiana.

To view a PDF of the article in The Catholic Moment, click HERE.

To view more photos of the Boiler ESTEEM students at the ESTEEM Capstone Conference, click HERE.



Join PC Pop online and enjoy the ramblings of pop culture, social media and leadership everywhere.


   

   pinterest-logo-2-1074x1067

Faith and Leadership — ESTEEM at St. Thomas Aquinas Purdue

In ESTEEM, Faith & Leadership, Leader, Leadership, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, Purdue, Uncategorized on April 4, 2012 at 1:14 pm

ESTEEM

Last Fall I was asked to participate as a member of the “faculty” for a new capstone LEADERSHIP program at St. Thomas Aquinas (Purdue) St. Thomas Aquinas - Purduecalled ESTEEM.  I was honored and accepted. ESTEEM is a national program which was started at Yale University.  St. Tom’s is one of the first university parishes to be selected for this program. In its inaugural year at St. Tom’s it has been a phenomenal success.  Through the journey we have encourage our ESTEEM student leaders to reflect on this unique experience. Hearing directly from the student participants how this program has had impact is much more meaningful and powerful.  So far two of our students have been courageous enough to share.  Please take a moment to READ these blog posts from two current St. Tom’s participants and hear about the experience from the students’ perspective:

To view photos of the Boiler ESTEEM students at the ESTEEM Capstone Conference, click HERE.


ESTEEM in the NEWS:


More Information from the ESTEEM website:

ESTEEM is a nationwide program to develop the leadership skills of young Catholics. St. Thomas Aquinas at Purdue is one of nine pilot campuses in the nation. The original pilot campuses are Yale University, Sacred Heart University (Connecticut), Michigan State University, The Ohio State University, Stanford University, and the University of California at Los Angeles. St. Thomas Aquinas at Purdue University became a pilot campus in the second year along with Villanova University and California State University at East Bay.

Employing a multifaceted approach, ESTEEM provides college students with the inspiration and tools for deeper engagement in the life and witness of the Church. An initiative of the National Leadership Roundtable on Church Management and Saint Thomas More Catholic Chapel & Center at Yale, ESTEEM focuses on the core competencies of spirituality, education, community and service.

  • ESTEEM is a groundbreaking national program created to develop the leadership abilities of Catholic young adults.
  • ESTEEM engages students through retreats, workshops, seminars, and fieldwork to develop leadership skills.
  • ESTEEM forges powerful mentor relationships between participants and professionals living their faith in inspirational ways.
  • ESTEEM develops the next generation of Catholic leaders.
  • ESTEEM is the Church’s future. Now.


So you’ve read and heard all about ESTEEM. You think it’s something that will work for you, whether a student, a campus ministry professional, or someone who wants to help the Church. Great. Shoot them an email or give them a call. They’ll help you out. ESTEEM is the Church’s Future. Now.

268 Park Street, New Haven, CT, 06511

t 202.223-8962 x18; f 203.777.0144