P.C.Pop with Pablo

Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

Class of 2022 – Mindset List of My Youngest Child

In College Students, Education, Pop Culture on August 26, 2018 at 11:46 am

First Day of SchoolPersonal note – This year the Mindset List is more meaningful and stranger than ever to me BECAUSE they are now talking about MY children, who are currently enrolled as a sophomore & first-year student at a four-year, state, research one, Big 10 university. Since becoming a higher education professional in 1987, I have loved reading the Mindset List. It is entertaining, insightful, educational and was helpful in my day-to-day work advocating and serving college students. But this year, I read it with new lenses. I am still interested in studying and learning about students — but this year it also reveals much about my own children and my own life as a parent. For the first time, I now can read it while reflecting on the milestones in my own children’s lives including this moment in their lives — perhaps the greatest milestone so far. #MindBlown


The Beloit College
Mindset List for the Class of 2022


Since 1998, the annual Mindset List has circulated internationally as a way of reminding professors everywhere that they aren’t just teaching courses, they’re also teaching students. The list has generated several books, prompted international discussions and lists and scores of speaking appearances around the country.


The New Millennium Belongs to This Year’s Entering College
Class of 2022
 in The 21st Annual Mindset List


Summary

  • classof22Human beings have always been living — not just traveling — in space. The United States has always been in Afghanistan. Same-sex marriage has always been legal somewhere and the once revolutionary “You’ve got mail” is almost forgotten.
  • A lot can change in just 18 years, but these same 18 years also make up the mindset—or “event horizon”—of today’s entering college students. Born in 2000, the first year of the new millennium, these students are members of the College Class of 2022.
  • Among the iconic figures never alive in their lifetime are Victor Borge, Charles Schulz, and the original Obi-Wan Kenobi Alec Guinness.
  • Among their classmates could be Madonna’s son Rocco, Will Smith’s daughter Willow, or David Bowie and Iman’s daughter Alexandria.

Since they have been on the planet:

  1. They are the first class born in the new millennium, escaping the dreaded label of “Millennial,” though their new designation—iGen, GenZ, etc. — has not yet been agreed upon by them.
  2. Outer space has never been without human habitation.
  3. They have always been able to refer to Wikipedia.
  4. They have grown up afraid that a shooting could happen at their school, too.
  5. People loudly conversing with themselves in public are no longer thought to be talking to imaginary friends.
  6. Calcutta has always been Kolkata.
  7. Afghanistan has always been the frustrating quagmire that keeps on giving.
  8. Investigative specials examining the O.J. Simpson case have been on TV annually since their birth.
  9. Same-sex couples have always found marital bliss in the Netherlands.
  10. When filling out forms, they are not surprised to find more than two gender categories to choose from.
  11. Presidential candidates winning the popular vote and then losing the election are not unusual.
  12. Parents have always been watching Big Brother, and vice versa.
  13. Someone has always skied non-stop down Mount Everest.
  14. They’ve grown up with stories about where their grandparents were on 11/22/63 and where their parents were on 9/11.
  15. Erin Brockovich has always offered a role model.
  16. The words veritas and horizon have always been joined together to form Verizon.
  17. They will never fly TWA, Swissair, or Sabena airlines.
  18. The Tower of Pisa has always had a prop to keep it leaning.
  19. There has never been an Enron.
  20. The Prius has always been on the road in the U.S.
  21. UK retail sales have always been organized in metrics, except for beer, still sold by the imperial pint.
  22. They never used a spit bowl in a dentist’s office.
  23. They have never seen a cross-town World Series.
  24. There has always been a Survivor.
  25. “You’ve got mail” would sound as ancient to them as “number, please” would have sounded to their parents.
  26. Mifepristone or RU-486, commonly called the “abortion pill,” has always been available in the U.S.
  27. A visit to a bank has been a rare event.
  28. Unable to come up with a new tune, Russians have always used the old Soviet national anthem.
  29. They have never had to deal with “chads,” be they dimpled, hanging, or pregnant.
  30. “Bipartisan” is soooo last century.
  31. Horton has always heard a Who on stage in Seussical the musical.
  32. Robert Downey Jr. has always been the sober Iron Man.
  33. Exotic animals have always been providing emotional support to passengers on planes.
  34. Starbucks has always served venti Caffè Lattes in Beijing’s Forbidden City.
  35. Light bulbs have always been shatterproof.
  36. Xlerators have always been drying hands in 15 seconds with a roar.
  37. I Love You has always been a computer virus.
  38. Thumbprints have always provided log in security—and are harder to lose—than a password.
  39. Robots have always been able to walk on two legs and climb stairs.
  40. None having served there, American Presidents have always visited Vietnam as Commander-in-Chief.
  41. There have always been space tourists willing to pay the price.
  42. Mass market books have always been available exclusively as Ebooks.
  43. Oprah has always been a magazine.
  44. Berets have always been standard attire for U.S. military uniforms.
  45. The folks may have used a Zipcar to get them to the delivery room on time.
  46. Bonefish Grill has always been serving sustainable seafood.
  47. As toddlers, they could be fined for feeding pigeons in Trafalgar Square in London.
  48. Google Doodles have never recognized major religious holidays.
  49. Chernobyl has never produced any power in their lifetimes.
  50. Donny and Marie who?
  51. They never tasted Pepsi Twist in the U.S.
  52. Denmark and Sweden have always been just a ten-minute drive apart via the Oresund Bridge.
  53. There have always been more than a billion people in India.
  54. Thanks to the Taliban, the colossal Buddhas of Bamiyan have never stood in Central Afghanistan.
  55. Films have always been distributed on the Internet.
  56. Environmental disasters such as the BP Deepwater Horizon, and the coal sludge spill in Martin City, Ky., have always exceeded the Exxon Valdez oil spill.
  57. The detachable computer mouse is almost extinct.
  58. The Mir space station has always been at the bottom of the South Pacific.
  59. King Friday the 13th and Lady Elaine Fairchild have always dwelled in the Neighborhood, but only in re-runs.
  60. Israeli troops have never occupied Southern Lebanon.

“All good things must come to a conclusion,” notes the Mindset List’s creator Ron Nief, Public affairs director emeritus at Beloit College. This will be the last year that the Mindset List will be associated with Beloit College, but it will continue in the future at themindsetlist.com or at a new institutional home. “We have enjoyed our 20 plus years of association with Beloit College, where the List began,” said Ron Nief.

The list was initiated in the early days of the internet and has been a popular component of back-to-school talks, faculty orientations and sermons for two decades. Its uses have ranged from training police and military officers and sales staff at Neiman Marcus, to the late Fidel Castro’s attacks on U.S. policy.

“With contributions from parents and academics around the world, the List has tracked cultural change, stimulated intergenerational conversation, and just made older people feel even older,” noted co-editors Tom McBride, author and Beloit emeritus professor of English, and Charles Westerberg, Beloit College sociologist.

The original authors have moved on to new projects in their retirement but will continue their battle against “hardening of the references” at their website, themindsetlist.com.

“Students come to college with particular assumptions based on the horizons of their lived experience,” McBride notes. “All teachers need to monitor their references, while students need to appreciate that without a sound education they will never get beyond the cave of their own limited personal experiences,”


Check us out on Facebook, with daily links and video blogs about the Generation Gap:

https://www.facebook.com/The-Mindset-List-107557649264963/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel

***

Copyright© 2018 Beloit College

Mindset List is a registered trademark

Advertisements

Flat Stanley travels to Indiana — Again

In Books, Children, Children's Literature, Comic Books, Education, Family, History, Lafayette Indiana, Literacy Month, Malavenda, NEA, NPR, Pablo Malavenda, Purdue, Reading Across America, Story Book Leadership, WBAA on May 29, 2016 at 9:12 pm

Dear Mrs. Burt’s Second Grade Class,


Thank you for sending Flat Stanley to visit me in Indiana. Flat Stanley and I have had a great time going to many of my favorite places in my hometown of West Lafayette as well as Lafayette, Franklin & Indianapolis, Indiana.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 048 (2)


First, I introduced Flat Stanley to my parents — as well as my brother, Maximilian, and our dog, Bailey (see the picture below). Max is a junior in high school; and Bailey is a “double dapple” miniature dachshund.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 054 (2)


Flat Stanley loved Bailey — but who can blame him? I then gave Flat Stanley a tour of our neighborhood, which is called Hadley Moors. It’s named after Hadley Lake which is near our house.


M__902E (2)


Next, I brought Flat Stanley to see one of the many corn and soybean fields in Indiana. Indiana corn and soybeans are used all over the world for lots of foods like popcorn, tofu, corn syrup, soy milk, and even ethanol gas for your cars.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 043 (2)2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 044 (2)


Look at Flat Stanley next to the corn stalks. He’s almost as tall as them because they just started growing. By August those stalks will be over 15 feet tall.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 039 (2)


I then took Flat Stanley to school with me. I am a sophomore at William Henry Harrison High School in West Lafayette. Besides my classes, my favorite activities at school are the Sunshine Society, photography and band — I play the flute.

Below is a picture of Flat Stanley looking at some of the pictures I took this year. The picture I took of the purple flower and the bumblebee won first prize. It’s a coneflower (also named Echinacea) from our flower garden at our house.


WP_20160529_15_23_25_Pro


My high school is named after President William Henry Harrison. President Harrison was from Indiana; and as the Governor of the Indiana territory, he led the Battle of Tippecanoe. The Battle of Tippecanoe is one of the most important battles in the history of our country – and it took place in 1811 (over 200 years ago) in the next town over from me – Battle Ground, Indiana. Our county is now named Tippecanoe; and the Wabash River separates our two cities – West Lafayette and Lafayette.


In addition to corn, Indiana is known as the “Crossroad of America” for many reasons including having lots of trains going through here.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 016 (2)


Flat Stanley & I are pictured on a bridge above the Four Corners Depot along the Wabash River in Downtown Lafayette.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 017 (2)


The Wabash River flows right into the Mississippi River. There are several trails and bridges that go along and over the Wabash River. Flat Stanley and I explored a few different parts of the Wabash River during his stay.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 021 (2)


My dad works at Lafayette Urban Ministry in Lafayette only four blocks from the River.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 011 (2)


Downtown Lafayette is a fun place to visit. Today Flat Stanley and I attended the “’Round the Fountain” Art Fair and the Farmer’s Market.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 012 (2)


The county courthouse for Tippecanoe County is in Lafayette, Indiana on the other side of the Wabash River. Above is a picture of Flat Stanley and me with the Tippecanoe County Courthouse in the background. On top of the courthouse dome is a 14 foot statue representing “Liberty.” In December the dome is filled with lights for the holidays.

Lafayette and West Lafayette were named after Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, who was a famous French General who helped President George Washington in the Revolutionary War.

Here is Flat Stanley with me at the courthouse fountain with a statue of General Lafayette.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 010 (2)


My hometown of West Lafayette is best known as the home of Purdue University.


IMG_0977 (2)


Purdue University is the flagship university of the State of Indiana. There are 40,000 students enrolled at Purdue. Purdue is named after John Purdue who gave land and money to the State of Indiana to start this state university. Flat Stanley and I are sitting below with the statue of John Purdue in front of the oldest building on campus, University Hall.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 023 (2)


Some of the famous alumni of Purdue include Orville Redenbacher (the popcorn guy); three NFL Super Bowl winning quarterbacks Drew Brees (New Orleans Saints), Len Dawson & Bob Griese (Miami Dolphins); John Wooden, basketball hall of famer; Ryan Newman, winner of the Daytona 500; Olympic gold medalist in diving, David Boudia; and 23 astronauts including Neil Armstrong. I actually got to meet Drew Brees when he was a student and heard Neil Armstrong speak at the dedication of this building — memories I will never forget.

Flat Stanley and I are pictured below at the Neil Armstrong statue in front of the Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering.


IMG_0979 (2)


My mom works in this building as the Communications & Marketing Coordinator for the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics in the College of Engineering.


IMG_0982 (2)


On display in Armstrong Hall are a full-scale replica of the Apollo 1 command module and a lunar sample also known as a “moon rock.” Flat Stanley and I are pictured above with the Apollo 1 space capsule. We are pictured below with the moon rock.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 2002 (2)2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 2004 (2)


We then went to the Purdue Airport. At Purdue, students can learn how to be pilots, airport managers, and air traffic controllers. All kinds of planes fly in and out of this airport including some really fast jets. The sports teams also use this airport to travel to games.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 026 (2)


West Lafayette is also the home of the Indiana Veterans’ Home. The Indiana Veterans’ Home is a place that helps all US veterans from the whole state of Indiana.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 034 (2)


I have been to the Veterans’ home many times to serve the veterans and to sing to them with my school choir on Veterans Day each November.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 031 (2)


The day we visited the Indiana Veterans’ Home there were lots of flags on display to celebrate and remember veterans on Memorial Day.

Flat Stanley and I then did a lot of my favorite things in town.

We started by visiting the Celery Bog and Lilly Nature Center.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 027 (2)


They have lots of cool programs like “how to catch fireflies.” My family often walk our dog, Bailey, on the trails here and ride our bikes on the bike trails.


There are lots of great restaurants in our town. While Flat Stanley was visiting, we ate at two of my favorite restaurants. Below, we’re at Igloo Frozen Custard where we shared a burger, fries and chocolate milk shake.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 002 (2)


Below, Flat Stanley and I stopped at the Dog N Suds Drive-in restaurant and had Coney Island chili dogs and Dog N Suds root beer in a frosted mug. My friend, Brett’s dad owns Dog N Suds.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 028 (2)


The next day we went to the Columbian Park in Lafayette. Columbian Park is named after Christopher Columbus. It is a great park.

It has a train that looks silly but is a lot of fun.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 007 (2)


It also has a really awesome water park called Tropicanoe Cove, which has water slides and a lazy river.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 004 (2)


The Columbian Park also has a Zoo. The Columbian Park Zoo is free!


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 005 (2)


The Zoo has hedgehogs, miniature horses, spider monkeys, prairie dogs, chinchillas, foxes, singing dogs, goats, porcupines, tamanduas, pot-belled pigs, armadillos, wallabies, polecats, llamas, gibbons — and a lot of birds, reptiles and other animals.

Flat Stanley liked the spider monkeys and gibbons the best. When I was your age — I attended a Zoo camp and had to milk a goat. We visit the park, especially the zoo, a lot in the summer.


This year, the State of Indiana is celebrating its bicentennial. This means that Indiana became a state 200 years ago this year. There are a lot of events planned to celebrate the Indiana Bicentennial — including the BISON-tennial Bison Project (get it?).


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 024 (2) 2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 025 (2)


Each of the 92 counties will each have at least one Bison on display. Our county, Tippecanoe County, has three bison. Flat Stanley and I visited the one called “Guardians of the Bond,” which was painted by artist Elizabeth Lincourt (see picture above).


Another day, Flat Stanley and I traveled to Franklin, Indiana — home of Franklin College. The city of Franklin and the college are named for one of our country’s founding fathers, Benjamin Franklin. The City of Franklin is about 96 miles south of West Lafayette.


IMG_0856 (2)

Here is a picture of Flat Stanley and me at the Ben Franklin statue on the Franklin College campus.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 2005 (2)

I was most excited to bring Flat Stanley to see me dance.

I am a member of the company dance team at Studio b in Lafayette.

I dance ballet, jazz, lyrical, and hip hop.

We compete several times a year. 2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 2007 (2)


IMG_0523 (2)


While Flat Stanley was visiting, we competed at the Groove Dance Competition in Indianapolis. Flat Stanley saw me dance in three different company routines and one ensemble with the entire company team. Dancing is a lot of fun — and we even get trophies sometimes.


IMG_0875 (2)


The picture above is Flat Stanley with the Studio b company team at Groove Indy.
Below is a selfie we took with my friend, Meredith.


IMG_1077 (2)


Lastly, Flat Stanley and I went to Mass at our church, St. Thomas Aquinas.


2016-05-28 Flat Stanley 022 (2)


Above Flat Stanley and I are outside the church. Below is a picture of Flat Stanley with our pastor, Fr. Patrick.


WP_20160529_12_00_35_Pro (2)


Flat Stanley and I had a blast. I hope you enjoy seeing the pictures of all of the places Flat Stanley and I visited in Indiana. Thank you again for sending Flat Stanley to me. See you soon.


Your friend (& first cousin once removed),


Zoe Katherine


Mindset List for the Class of 2019

In College Students, Education, Lists, Malavenda, New Year, Pablo Malavenda on August 18, 2015 at 11:55 am

The Beloit College
Mindset List for the Class of 2019


Students heading into their first year of college this year are mostly 18 and were born in 1997. Among those who have never been alive in their lifetimes are Princess Diana, Notorious B.I.G., Jacques Cousteau, and Mother Teresa. Joining them in the world the year they were born were Dolly the sheep, The McCaughey septuplets, and Michael “Prince” Jackson Jr.


Since they have been on the planet:class_of_2019_tile_coaster

  1. Hybrid automobiles have always been mass produced.
  2. Google has always been there, in its founding words, “to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible.”
  3. They have never licked a postage stamp.
  4. Email has become the new “formal” communication, while texts and tweets remain enclaves for the casual.
  5. Four foul-mouthed kids have always been playing in South Park.
  6. Hong Kong has always been under Chinese rule.
  7. They have grown up treating Wi-Fi as an entitlement.
  8. The NCAA has always had a precise means to determine a national champion in college football.
  9. The announcement of someone being the “first woman” to hold a position has only impressed their parents.
  10. Charlton Heston is recognized for waving a rifle over his head as much as for waving his staff over the Red Sea.
  11. Color photos have always adorned the front page of The New York Times.
  12. Ellis Island has always been primarily in New Jersey.
  13. “No means no” has always been morphing, slowly, into “only yes means yes.”
  14. Cell phones have become so ubiquitous in class that teachers don’t know which students are using them to take notes and which ones are planning a party.
  15. The Airport in Washington, D.C., has always been Reagan National Airport.
  16. Their parents have gone from encouraging them to use the Internet to begging them to get off of it.
  17. If you say “around the turn of the century,” they may well ask you, “which one?”
  18. They have avidly joined Harry Potter, Ron, and Hermione as they built their reading skills through all seven volumes.
  19. Attempts at human cloning have never been federally funded but do require FDA approval.
  20. “Crosstown Classic” and the “Battle of the Bay” have always been among the most popular interleague rivalries in Major League Baseball.
  21. Carry Me Back to Old Virginny has never been the official song of the Virginia Commonwealth.
  22. Phish Food has always been available from Ben and Jerry.
  23. Kyoto has always symbolized inactivity about global climate change.
  24. When they were born, cell phone usage was so expensive that families only used their “bag phones,” usually in cars, for emergencies.
  25. The therapeutic use of marijuana has always been legal in a growing number of American states.
  26. The eyes of Texas have never looked upon The Houston Oilers.
  27. Teachers have always had to insist that term papers employ sources in addition to those found online.
  28. In a world of DNA testing, the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington has never included a Vietnam War veteran “known only to God.”
  29. Playhouse Disney was a place where they could play growing up.
  30. Surgeons have always used “super glue” in the operating room.
  31. Fifteen nations have always been constructing the International Space Station.
  32. The Lion King has always been on Broadway.
  33. Phoenix Lights is a series of UFO sightings, not a filtered cigarette.
  34. Scotland and Wales have always had their own parliaments and assemblies.
  35. At least Mom and Dad had their new Nintendo 64 to help them get through long nights sitting up with the baby.
  36. First Responders have always been heroes.
  37. Sir Paul and Sir Elton have always been knights of the same musical roundtable.
  38. CNN has always been available en Español.
  39. Heaven’s Gate has always been more a trip to Comet Hale-Bopp and less a film flop.
  40. Splenda has always been a sweet option in the U.S.
  41. The Atlanta Braves have always played at Turner Field.
  42. Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic have always been members of NATO.
  43. Humans have always had implanted radio frequency ID chips—slightly larger than a grain of rice.
  44. TV has always been in such high definition that they could see the pores of actors and the grimaces of quarterbacks.
  45. Jones and Mr. Smith have always been Men in Black, not their next-door neighbors.
  46. Their proud parents recorded their first steps on camcorders, mounted on their shoulders like bazookas.
  47. They had no idea how fortunate they were to enjoy the final four years of Federal budget surpluses.
  48. Amoco gas stations have steadily vanished from the American highway.
  49. Vote-by-mail has always been the official way to vote in Oregon.
  50. …and there has always been a Beloit College Mindset List.

PLUS: A Little Millennial Jargon 

In fairness to the class of 2019 the following are a few of the expressions from their culture that will baffle their parents, older friends, and teachers. They might even baffle YOU.  (You can find translations further down.)

  1. They need to plan ahead so they don’t find themselves “dankrupt.”
  2.  A heavy dose of “Natty Light” has always caught up with them in the morning.As long as they can find a ballpoint pen they can use their “redneck teleprompter.” 
  3. As long as they can find a ballpoint pen they can use their “redneck teleprompter.” 
  4. “Smartphone shuffles” have always slowed down traffic between classes. 
  5. “Vatican Roulette” has always been risky but acceptable. 
  6. A significant other who is a bit “too Yoko Ono” has always created tension.  
  7. “Quiche” has everything to do with hot and nothing to do with food.
  8. “Trolling” innocents on social media has always been uncharitable. 
  9. They’ll know better than to text their professors “TL DR” about assignments
  10. Slurring “textroverts” have always been a fact of social life.” 

 And Last, Your Personal Explainer

Baffled by the Millennial jargon you’ve just read? Feeling old? Here’s a glossary that will end your bewilderment and make you feel hip!

1. They need to plan ahead so they don’t find themselves “dankrupt.”

  • One of a variety of painful declarations that we are out of weed

 2. A heavy dose of “Natty Light” has always caught up with them in the morning.

  • It may taste great and be less filling, but there are limits.

3. As long as they can find a ballpoint pen they can use their “redneck teleprompter.” 

  • The bigger the back of your hand, the more notes you can include, but don’t get caught looking.

4. “Smartphone shuffles” have always slowed down traffic between classes. 

  • One can avoid all eye contact as one moves through the madding texting crowd.

5. “Vatican Roulette” has always been risky but acceptable. 

  • If you’ve got rhythm and like your planning natural, then Vatican Roulette is the game for you.

6. A significant other who is a bit “too Yoko Ono” has always created tension.  

  • A partner too hard to handle…hard for your friends to compete with perfection

7. “Quiche” has everything to do with hot and nothing to do with food.

  • Turn down the heat. Some people are just so hot they enhance the appetite.

8. “Trolling” innocents on social media has always been uncharitable. 

  • Cynical and bullying attacks on happy campers, preserved on the internet, may come back to haunt you

9. They’ll know better than to text their professors “TL DR” about assignments

  • …and just hope their professor doesn’t scribble back to them, about their own papers: “TOO LONG: DIDN”T READ.”

10. Slurring “textroverts” have always been a fact of social life.

  • If you’re too drunk to say it face to face, you probably should wait until morning before you start texting. 

The Beloit College Mindset List, which this year is as old as the entering students themselves, is created by Ron Nief, Emeritus Director of Public Affairs; Tom McBride, Emeritus Professor of English; and Charles Westerberg. Additional items on the list as well as commentaries and guides are found at www.beloit.edu/mindset and www.themindsetlist.com. Regular updates and discussions are on Facebook and Twitter (@MindsetList).

***

Copyright© 2015 Beloit College

Mindset List is a registered trademark

Tax-Free Holiday is Needed in Indiana

In Children, Education, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, parenting on August 9, 2015 at 10:54 am

Please Sign Petition for a Tax-Free Holiday in Indiana!


Click HERE.



NYLiBFmPIpBympy-800x450-noPadThis weekend – dozens of US states are not charging state income tax on “back to school” needs — but NOT Indiana. Such a simple gesture by lawmakers — is making a significant impact on the budgets of thousands of families — who NEED it. Tax-Free Holidays is one small way to give parents, grandparents, families a little bit of a financial break — at a very stressful time of year for hardworking families who struggle financially.


Education is Important


Since working at Lafayette Urban Ministry — I have learned that most families want the best for their kids, work very hard, and are still struggling. And families who struggle financial — absolutely hate certain times of year. Back-to-School is one of them. Parents want to give their kids the resources it takes to have a better life than they. The key to breaking the cycle of poverty is EDUCATION.


Education is Expensive


But to get the best education you need money — yes, even in the public school systems.

  • FIRST kids need the basics — books, pens, trapper keepers, calculators, computers and more. Indiana Public schools charge families $500+ a year per child just for textbooks — and they rarely have enough books for all of the students.
  • SECOND, kids want to fit in — so, they need new & stylish clothes, smart phone, the latest athletic shoes, tickets to athletic events, tickets to dances, clothes for dances and more.
  • THIRD, extra-curricular involvement costs a lot of money — band, sports, and even student council, debate team, and service clubs require special equipment, uniforms, team photos, snacks, tickets, tournament fees, travel expenses and more.

Research proves that kids get a better education when they have the right supplies, don’t have anxiety about fitting in, aren’t bullied because they are poor, AND are able to participate in athletics, band, music, clubs and organizations, dance, and sporting events. News flash — ALL OF THIS IS EXPENSIVE.

National Retail Federation says on average, parents of kids in grades K through 12 will spend $670 on school supplies this year.  That includes clothes, shoes, and electronics.  PLUS in Indiana — public school “book rental” fees are typically $400+ per child — and if you have a high school athlete or musician, it’s another $40-100 not including personal equipment, tickets to games, team photos, and snack donations. School is very expensive — even public school.


Boost to the Economy


There is also evidence that it boosts the economy. Families love it, Retailers love it — so, if you’re a state legislator, why wouldn’t you just do it? They are very popular — all you have to do is go shopping in a Tax-Free Holiday State — and you will see excitement in the mall. It’s a great idea. Tax-Free Holidays have been adopted by conservative and liberal state legislatures. This is not a democrat or republican issue — this is a way to support families. This is a way of demonstrating as a public official that you acknowledge families, you support families, you support education and you actually want to have a positive impact.


US States with Tax-Free Holidays for 2015:


sales-tax-holiday-usmap-2015


  • Alabama Tax Free Weekend – August 7-9
  • Arkansas Tax Free Weekend – August 1-2
  • Connecticut Tax Free Weekend – August 16-22
  • Florida Tax Free Weekend – August 7-16
  • Georgia Tax Free Weekend – July 31-August 1
  • Iowa Tax Free Weekend, August 7-8
  • Louisiana Tax Free Weekend, August 7-8
  • Maryland Tax Free Weekend, August 9-15
  • Massachusetts Tax Free Weekend, August 15-16
  • Mississippi Tax Free Weekend, July 31-August 1; September 4-6
  • Missouri Tax Free Weekend, August 19-25
  • New Mexico Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9
  • Ohio Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9
  • Oklahoma Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9
  • South Carolina Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9
  • Tennessee Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9
  • Texas Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9
  • Virginia Tax Free Weekend, August 7-9

Please sign this petition asking our Governor and state legislature to pass a similar law in Indiana. PLEASE SIGN & SHARE!


THANK YOU.

Flat Stanley travels to Indiana

In Books, Children, Children's Literature, Comic Books, Education, Family, History, Lafayette Indiana, Literacy Month, Malavenda, NEA, NPR, Pablo Malavenda, Purdue, Reading Across America, Story Book Leadership, WBAA on June 1, 2014 at 1:26 am

Dear Mrs. Egan’s Second Grade Class,


Thank you for sending Flat Stanley to visit me in Indiana. Flat Stanley and I have had a great time going to many of my favorite places in my hometown of West Lafayette as well as Lafayette and Battle Ground, Indiana.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 040 (2)


First, I gave Flat Stanley a tour of our neighborhood, which is called Hadley Moors. It’s named after Hadley Lake which is near our house. Next, I brought Flat Stanley to see one of the many corn and soybean fields in Indiana. Indiana corn and soybeans are used all over the world for lots of foods like popcorn, tofu, corn syrup, soy milk, and even ethanol gas for your cars.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 004 (2)


In addition to corn, Indiana is known as the “Crossroad of America” for many reasons including having lots of trains going through here. Flat Stanley and I are pictured on a bridge above the Four Corners Depot along the Wabash River in Downtown Lafayette.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 015 (2)


I then took Flat Stanley to school with me. I am a freshman at William Henry Harrison High School in West Lafayette. Besides my classes, my favorite activity at school is band. This year I played alto-saxophone in the marching band, the pep band and the jazz band. I also am on the cross country team.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 038 (2)


My high school is named after President William Henry Harrison. President Harrison was from Indiana; and as the Governor of the Indiana territory, he led the Battle of Tippecanoe.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 029 (2)


The Battle of Tippecanoe is one of the most important battles in the history of our country – and it took place in 1811 (over 200 years ago) in the next town over from me – Battle Ground, Indiana.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 032 (2)


Battle Ground is named for the site of this battle – the site of the battle is now a Registered National Landmark, with a statue of William Henry Harrison (see us below).


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 031 (2)


Today, the Battle Field Park is a fun place to go to learn about the Battle of Tippecanoe and to hike on the trails along the river — but it also has lots of festivals throughout the summer. Two of my favorites are the annual Indiana Fiddlers’ Gathering (music festival) and the Steam and Gas Power Show.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 008 (2)


The battle took place near the Tippecanoe and Wabash Rivers.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 013 (2)


Our county is now named Tippecanoe; and the Wabash River separates our two cities – West Lafayette and Lafayette.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 014 (2)


The Wabash River flows right into the Mississippi River. There are several trails and bridges that go along and over the Wabash River. Flat Stanley and I explored a few different parts of the Wabash River during his stay.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 010 (2)


Downtown Lafayette is a fun place to visit. Today Flat Stanley and I attended the “’Round the Fountain” Art Fair and the Farmer’s Market.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 011 (2)


The county courthouse for Tippecanoe County is in Lafayette, Indiana on the other side of the Wabash River.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 012 (2)


Above is a picture of Flat Stanley and me with the Tippecanoe County Courthouse in the background. On top of the courthouse dome is a 14 foot statue representing “Liberty.” In December the dome is filled with lights for the holidays.

Lafayette and West Lafayette were named after Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, who was a famous French General who helped President George Washington in the Revolutionary War.

Here is Flat Stanley with me at the courthouse fountain with a statue of General Lafayette.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 009 (2)


Lafayette also has several big factories that make lots of the things you enjoy in Connecticut —— like Subaru Outback cars, Caterpillar equipment, and Alcoa aluminum, which is used to make aluminum bats. Here are pictures of Flat Stanley and me at these three factories.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 026 (2)


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 025 (2)


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 022 (2)


My hometown of West Lafayette is best known as the home of Purdue University.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 007 (2)


Purdue University is the flagship university of the State of Indiana. There are 40,000 students enrolled at Purdue.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 009 (2)


Here, Flat Stanley and I are pictured under the Purdue Alumni Gateway Arch and the Bell Tower. Look carefully at the base of the Bell Tower and you will see us. The bells in the Bell Tower play music — even the Purdue Fight Song.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 004 (2)


Purdue is named after John Purdue who gave land and money to the State of Indiana to start this state university. Flat Stanley and I are sitting below with the statue of John Purdue in front of the oldest building on campus, University Hall.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 019 (2)


Some of the famous alumni of Purdue include Orville Redenbacher (the popcorn guy); three NFL Super Bowl winning quarterbacks Drew Brees (New Orleans Saints), Len Dawson & Bob Griese (Miami Dolphins); John Wooden, basketball hall of famer; Ryan Newman, winner of the Daytona 500; Olympic gold medalist in diving, David Boudia; and 23 astronauts including Neil Armstrong.


2014-05-23 FlatStanley 006 (2)


I actually got to meet Drew Brees when he was a student and heard Neil Armstrong speak at the dedication of this building — memories I will never forget.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 013 (2)


Pictured below is Flat Stanley and me with my friends at the Neil Armstrong statue in front of the Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering.


2014-05-23 FlatStanley 003 (2)


2014-05-23 FlatStanley 002 (2)


Purdue sports play in the Big 10 conference. They have lots of sports teams including basketball, soccer, tennis, volleyball, track & field, wrestling, swimming, diving, baseball, softball, rowing, sailing, rugby, gymnastics, ice hockey, and football.

Flat Stanley and I are pictured below at the Ross-Ade Stadium where Purdue plays football.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 010 (2)


I performed here with my high school marching band during half time of a Purdue football game last September. That was a very cool experience.

Flat Stanley and I visited the Grand Prix Track (a student go-cart race), and the soccer and baseball stadiums.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 003 (2)


We then went to the Purdue Boathouse, home of the Purdue Crew Team, on the Wabash River.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 007 (2)


I also took Flat Stanley to see the Purdue Airport. If you look closely in the upper left hand corner, you can see the air traffic control tower.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 006 (2)


At Purdue, students can learn how to be pilots, airport managers, and air traffic controllers. All kinds of planes fly in and out of this airport including some really fast jets. The sports teams also use this airport to travel to games.

West Lafayette is also the home of the Indiana Veterans’ Home. The Indiana Veterans’ Home is a place that helps all US veterans from the whole state of Indiana.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 035 (2)


I have been to the Veterans’ home many times to serve the veterans and to sing to them with my school choir on Veterans Day each November.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 037 (2)


The day we visited the Indiana Veterans’ Home there were lots of flags on display to celebrate and remember veterans on Memorial Day.

Flat Stanley and I then did a lot of my favorite things in town.

We started by visiting the Celery Bog and Nature Center.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 001 (2)


They have lots of cool programs like “how to catch fireflies.” My family often walk our dog, Bailey, on the trails here and ride our bikes on the bike trails.

We then went to the Tippecanoe Amphitheater. They have an outdoor stage where we have seen shows. There are trails here, too. The trails at the Amphitheater are the official cross country trails for my high school cross country team — so, I run these trails a lot.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 033 (2)


There are lots of great restaurants in our town. While Flat Stanley was visiting, we ate at two of my favorite restaurants. Below, Flat Stanley and I are sharing Broccoli Cheddar soup in a bread bowl at Panera Bread.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 023 (2)


Below we stopped at the Dog N Suds Drive-in restaurant and had Coney Island chili dogs and Dog N Suds root beer in a frosted mug. My friend, Brett’s dad owns Dog N Suds.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 023 (2)


Flat Stanley and I then went Bowling…


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 018 (2)


and Played some Air Hockey and…


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 017 (2)


Played a little bit of pocket Billiards (pool).


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 015 (2)


I then took Flat Stanley to Von’s, my favorite local store. Von’s sells lots of stuff including comic books, books, and records/CDs/DVDs.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 022 (2)


We then went to the movies — which I love doing. We saw the new X-Men movie.


2014-05-23 FlatStanley 001 (2)


The next day we went to the Columbian Park in Lafayette. Columbian Park is named after Christopher Columbus. It is a great park.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 018 (2)


It has a train that looks silly but is a lot of fun.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 020 (2)


It also has a really awesome water park called Tropicanoe Cove, which has water slides and a lazy river.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 017 (2)


The Columbian Park also has a Zoo. The Columbian Park Zoo is free!


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 021 (2)


The Zoo has hedgehogs, miniature horses, spider monkeys, prairie dogs, chinchillas, foxes, singing dogs, goats, porcupines, tamanduas, pot-belled pigs, armadillos, wallabies, polecats, llamas, gibbons — and a lot of birds, reptiles and other animals.


2014-05-24 FlatStanley 019 (2)


Flat Stanley liked the spider monkeys and gibbons the best. When I was your age — I attended a Zoo camp and had to milk a goat. We visit the park, especially the zoo, a lot in the summer.

Before Flat Stanley went home to Connecticut, I wanted him to see where my mother works. She is a news producer on National Public Radio at WBAA radio station. Flat Stanley used the microphone in the radio studio where my mom works.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 003 (2)


Lastly, Flat Stanley and I went to Mass at our church, St. Thomas Aquinas. It also happens to be where my father works as the parish administrator.


2014-05-25 FlatStanley 001 (2)


Flat Stanley and I had a blast. I hope you enjoy seeing the pictures of all of the places Flat Stanley and I visited in Indiana.

Thank you again for sending Flat Stanley to me. See you soon.


Your friend (& first cousin once removed),


Maximilian Xavier


 

LUM Achieve Students “March on Washington”

In Education, History, Lafayette Indiana, Leadership, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, social media, Uncategorized on August 26, 2013 at 3:48 pm

PCPopSocialMediaLogoAs a part of PC Pop Social Media, I was asked to travel to Washington DC with a youth group to participate in the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington.

The students on the LUM Youth Trip to Washington are enrolled at an academic enrichment program at the Lafayette Urban Ministry (Indiana) called Achieve! Stay-in-School Program. Achieve recruits middle school students who are at-risk academically and qualify for the 21st Century Scholars program, which entitled them to free tuition in any Indiana state university, if they continue to meet certain award criteria. These student committed in writing to a rigorous learning enrichment program meant to ensure that they succeed. LUM decided that these students would get a tremendous experience by traveling to Washington and experiencing first hand a significant part of our nation’s history.

My role in this trip was to document the students’ experience. I jumped at the chance to travel with these students to Washington for two reasons: first – I personally wanted to “March on Washington” for the 50th; second – I was excited about the opportunity to see it through the eyes of these young Americans. I took hundreds of photos, interviewed the students with each conversation, observed their actions and reactions, coached them on visiting a major event in a big US city, and wrote about their collective journey. I was posting and blogging as it was happening — trying to capture the excitement, the awe, the history and the transformation of each participant in our group.

Although it was only a three day trip — it changed my life. It is a trip I will remember fondly the rest of my life. I believe it had the same, if not greater, impact on the seven LUM-Achieve students who were brave enough and wise enough to take advantage of this once in a lifetime experience. I have a dream that I will travel back to DC for the 100th anniversary with this very same group of students in 2063!

Enjoy this travel blog — and let me know what you think.

Lafayette Urban Ministry

youth trip to washington dc



Travel Blog — LUM Youth Trip to Washington


Friday, August 23, 2013


7 a.m.


Anthony, Lourdes, Makaylah, TK, Cassandra, Noah and Fatima arrived — excited — for the bus ride to Washington DC. They loaded the bus quickly; they were loud for a bit; then, they were all asleep shortly there after.


2013-08-22 LUM Youth Trip to Washington 001 (2)


Left to Right:
(Front Row) Sandra Dunn-El, Makaylah Douglas (Jefferson High School), Fatima Sanchez (Jefferson High School), Lourdes Sanchez (Jefferson High School);
(Back Row) – Joe Tylenda, Joe Micon, TK Young (Jefferson High School), Anthony Hicks (West Lafayette High School), Noah Ortiz (Wea Ridge Middle School), Cassandra Ortiz (McCutcheon High School)


NOON


Their first stop was a quick potty-break at a rest stop off the highway in Ohio.

The next stop was McDonald’s in Licking, Ohio near Buckeye Lake. Quick lunch — recharge devices — and then back on the road.


2013-08-22 LUM Youth Trip to Washington 005 (2)


2013-08-22 LUM Youth Trip to Washington 004 (2)


2013-08-22 LUM Youth Trip to Washington 003 (2)


The road trip east to Washington DC…

View original post 1,503 more words

“Harold and the Purple Crayon” — Story Book Leadership

In Books, Children, Children's Literature, College Students, Education, Harold & the Purple Crayon, Leadership, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, Story Book Leadership, Uncategorized on November 12, 2012 at 7:33 am

Story Book Leadership -- Harold & the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnsonby Crockett Johnson (1955, Harper & Row, New York)


{First Read PC Pop post: Story Book Leadership — Getting Started — 8 Steps to Powerful Presentations, which you will give you more specific information on how to use children’s literature in teaching leadership to college students and adults.}


Topics:

  • Controlling your Destiny
  • Crisis Management
  • Creativity
  • Goal Setting
  • Problem Solving

Plot (in six words):

Harold takes adventures with his crayon.


Plot Summary:

The story begins with Harold wanting to take a walk and explore with his purple crayon. Soon Harold is fighting dragons, feeding pie to porcupines and falling off a mountain ledge. Harold uses his purple crayon throughout the story to draw his way out of each of his dilemmas and life threatening accidents. After a while Harold just wants to go home but he is a bit lost. Again he uses his quick wit and his purple crayon and finds his way back to his room and drifts off to sleep.

Despite all of Harold’s adventures, it is an easy paced story. The artwork is simple and so is the story. But the lessons for Leaders are powerful and inspiring.


Getting Started

When I use children’s literature to teach Leadership to college students — I like to surprise them. I keep the book hidden until we are ready to begin. I ask them to take it seriously and be ready to discuss the book and its leadership lessons. I also like to use props like real purple Crayola crayons or a big (3 foot) purple crayon bank. I have also led the students to our room by having them follow a purple line on the floor — made by using colored duct tape.

Once the students are settled and I have selected someone to show the pictures from the story book, I read the book to the students and then begin the reflection. For the reflection discussion I basically use a three step process asking: WHAT?, SO WHAT?, and NOW WHAT? Ask the question and wait for a response. Be ready for creative and insightful answers. As the facilitator you should encourage a lively and meaningful discussion by not being too judgmental but keeping them on track. Practice active listening and clarify and summarize their comments when necessary. For more specific information on the Story Book Leadership method, read the PC Pop post: Story Book Leadership — Getting Started — 8 Steps to Powerful Presentations.

Below are suggestions on specifics questions to direct your discussion and some answers to expect after reading Harold & the Purple Crayon to your group of student leaders.


WHAT.

Question: What was this story about?

  • This is a story about an adventurous and imaginative boy name Harold who has a magic Purple Crayon. When Harold gets in trouble he uses his crayon to draw.

SO WHAT.Story Book Leadership -- Harold & the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson

Now that you know the story — So what? Why do you think the story was chosen for you at this stage in your leadership with this organization.

  • Question: Who is Harold?
    • Person with authority, with titles, with power
    • Leaders, student leaders, bosses, organization officers
    • Team members, committee chairs
  • Student Leaders need to be…
    • Adventurous, Risk takers, daring
    • Innovative, creative
    • Forward thinking, visionary, moving forward
    • Confident, decisive
  • Attitude — Remain positive, calm, and be able to Make the Best of each situation
  • Problem Solving/Dealing with Crises
    • Be able to deal with problems
    • Don’t blame others
    • Focus on solving the problem not who’s at fault
    • Make sound and quick decisions — decisive
    • Be able to Act
    • Use all of your resources and experience
  • Question: What is represented by the Purple Crayon?
    • Your “wits”
    • Resources
    • Decisions, problem solving
  • Question: How did Harold react to the Police Officer? How did Harold react to each dilemma or crisis?
    • Harold kept calm
    • Harold used his Purple Crayon, his resources and experience, to take action and solve problems
    • Harold remained polite — even when others like the police officer were not helpful
    • Harold remained positive — never wasting his time or energy trying to find out “who is to blame”
    • Harold focused on solving the problem
  • Question: What is the meaning of the Moon, the Bedroom Window, Bedroom? What is special about Home?
    • There are things that guide us morally in life — the Moon, Window — and we must always keep them in view
    • Home is a comfort — and we all eventually want to and need to go Home
    • Home represents family and community focused values
    • Even the most adventurous leader must “go Home” and rest — get renewed

NOW WHAT?

Now that the students are aware of the lessons learned from the adventures of Harold and his Purple Crayon — Now what?

  • Question: As leaders, how can you use this information and new insight to make a positive impact on your organization and environment?
    • Encourage the participants to use “I” statements like “In the future I will be more patient when problems arise and focus on the problem and not on who to blame.”
    • As a leader, I will take more risks and use all of my resources and experience to persevere even when times get tough or things don’t go my way.

CLOSING THE SESSION

  • Lastly, ask the group a few closing questions like:
    • How did this exercise make you feel?
    • Did you enjoy learning in this manner?
  • Encourage the student leaders to use Story Book Leadership in their workshops, meetings and retreats.

The information above is merely to give the presenter a better idea of what to expect during the discussion of Harold and the Purple Story Book Leadership -- Harold & the Purple Crayon by Crockett JohnsonCrayon. The key to making this a successful exercise is allowing and encouraging the participants to engage in a meaningful conversation about the Leadership Lessons in the book, how it relates to their current leadership experience, and what they can do NOW to use the ideas from this book to improve their organization and their environment.

College students and adults love to regress with a quality children’s book. If you select a well-written, well illustrated book that is relevant to the leaders — you will get a wonderful response from your participants. They will laugh, learn, and gain new insights while enjoying every minute — what more could you hope for?


For more information on Story Book Leadership, read the PC Pop posts as follows:


How to Say NO to Facebook – Advice for Families and Educators

In Education, Facebook, Family, Malavenda, Pablo Malavenda, parenting, social media, Uncategorized on October 7, 2012 at 7:42 pm


Facebook – Advice for Families and Educators

Each day in the life of a parent of a teenager or tween invites challenges. Parenting today’s youth contains so many contradictions and conflicts. We want our kids to respect us — and like us. Kids need and are begging for boundaries — but we don’t know how to say “No.” We want to protect our kids from worshiping material things but we want them to have better stuff than their friends. We hope our kids will follow the rules but we teach them how to break them every day. Some decisions are easy – say No to drugs, don’t steal, don’t cheat. Others are not so simple, like when it is OK to date, go to an R rated movie, or get on Facebook.

This post can’t possible cover all of those issues adequately – so, let’s focus on one – how to deal with that inevitable question about Facebook. My first reaction to parents and educators is that it is simple – follow the rules and agreement. Most people “agree” and “accept” agreements with online sites and software without ever reading a word. Scroll, scroll, scroll, scroll…click the “I accept” box and submit. So it is no surprise that very few know Facebook has an age minimum. Here is an excerpt from the Facebook Agreement you accepted (but most likely did not read) under the Safety Section, specifically “Registration and Account Security.”


Facebook – Statement of Rights and Responsibilities

Facebook users provide their real names and information, and we need your help to keep it that way. Here are some commitments you make to us relating to registering and maintaining the security of your account:

    • You will not provide any false personal information on Facebook, or create an account for anyone other than yourself without permission.
    • You will not use Facebook if you are under 13.

Facebook and many other online sites like Twitter, Instagram, and all Google products including Gmail and YouTube has age restrictions to show good faith to the US Federal government. These social networking sites have adopted these policies based on their interpretation of the US Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act of 1998 also known as COPPA.


Here are some COPPA facts:

  • COPPA is a Federal Law
  • COPPA was Enacted on October 21, 1998
  • COPPA became Effective on April 21, 2000
  • COPPA applies to the “online collection of personal information by persons or entities under U.S. jurisdiction from children under 13 years of age.”
  • It details what a website operator must include in a privacy policy, when and how to seek verifiable consent from a parent or guardian, and what responsibilities an operator has to protect children’s privacy and safety online including restrictions on the marketing to those under 13.
  • While children under 13 can legally give out personal information with their parents’ permission, many websites altogether disallow underage children from using their services due to the amount of paperwork involved.

This doesn’t stop kids under 13 from getting Facebook profiles on their own or asking their parents to give their blessing for a Facebook profile. Facebook doesn’t do too much to prevent kids from creating a profile. Facebook screens out kids by requiring new members to submit their birth month, birth day, and birth year. If the birth year reveals that the person registering is over 13 years old – they make it past the one and only hurdle imposed by Facebook. Most kids savvy enough to know about Facebook are savvy enough to fudge their birth year to get approved for a profile. The only other ways a minor may lose their Facebook account is if another user reports them as being under age or they change their birth date information too often. Otherwise, once a minor gets in they are set.

After surveying the parents of the kids who were already using Facebook, many of these parents admitted to helping their children falsify their information to get a Facebook account — creating what is known as a “Virtual Fake ID.” Parents who actually help their kids commit fraud when registering with Facebook concern me for a couple of reasons. These parents either don’t completely understand the dangers of kids using Facebook, or they know the risk and don’t really care. Most of these parents find it very difficult to deny their kids anything. So when the kids ask for access to Facebook stating that all of their friends are on Facebook, the parents concede. These parents don’t want their kids to have less than other kids, and they really want their kids to like them and think they’re the cool parents. So these parents teach their kids to cheat, lie and commit fraud to get that much desired Facebook account. With these families, saying NO to Facebook is not their real issue. The good news is most parents know that there are risks and know they should say NO but just need some advice on “how to say NO” and information that supports the claim of risk and danger.



As parents, that day arrived for us when our kids were in fifth and fourth grades. My son came home and told us that many of his friends had Facebook profiles and he was wondering if he should get one too. We sat down with both of our kids and told them that Facebook did not allow kids under 13 years old to register – and kids between the ages of 13 and 17 needed their parents’ permission and the parents’ commitment to monitor their activity. We continued the discussion with our two kids about our concerns and about the risks and dangers of the internet. The topics or discussion points we used in our conversation with our two kids are as following:


  • Purpose of Facebook — The original purpose of Facebook which was to assist college students in connecting online – and now any adult. Due to the amount of college students and young adults using Facebook — inappropriate content and language is freely shared, used, and available. Just like we wouldn’t allow them to wander around a university campus at their age, they shouldn’t be allowed to wander around Facebook at their age. Quite simply, Facebook was not designed for kids.
  • Why an Age Restriction – First it is part of a Federal Law and written into the Facebook agreement. We as a family follow rules and obey laws. A lot of research and discussion was involved in passing the law and creating the rule; therefore we will comply.
  • You Don’t Need It – When kids get older and go to college, Facebook is a useful tool to keep in touch with your high school friends and family.  Once you graduate college and/or get a job in the real world, your network of friends, family and colleagues will most likely extend across the country and perhaps will be global. Facebook will then be a useful tool to keep in touch, share information, and develop relationships that may assist you in life and your career development. But until you can show your parents that you need Facebook to communicate or stay connected to your friends – you should not be on Facebook. Go to school and talk to your friends instead.
  • Too Public, Too Many Strangers. Due to the amount of users (more than 1 billion to date), there is a great potential for predators to hurt them, harass them or just pick on them and make them feel bad. Bullying is a real issue, and cyber-bullying is even easier and potentially more damaging. Even though kids are using the internet and Facebook in the safety of their own home – it is a very public place. Kids are just not developmentally ready to be on their own in such a public place with potentially a billion strangers watching them.
  • Waste of Time – Addictive. How it can become addictive and a waste of valuable time – taking away from the true priorities of doing well in school, having friends, and participating in other activities like sports, band and student council. Online addiction is a real issue especially with kids who are easily distracted, seeking attention or validation, or avoiding work. This by the way describes most children, tweens and young teens.
  • But Others Kids are Doing It. Why other kids are doing it and we can’t. In our family, we have already established with our kids through various conversations that other families may make different decisions than us. We are not going to judge other families but typically what other parents do will not have an impact on us. Only we know what is right and good for our family.

That being said, it is great when the parents of your kids’ friends have similar rules about Facebook. It is the Tooth Fairy Syndrome – when you discovered that one kid in your kids’ circle of friends has received $10 for just one tooth from the Tooth Fairy. Those parents ruined it for the rest of us parents whose kids only got 50¢ to a dollar per tooth from the Tooth Fairy. For this reason it is worth having a discussion with other parents, your kids’ teachers, and other family members to see if you can establish some consistency in the messages your kids are getting about social media and social networking. Most parents when they are educated about the dangers and risks of kids using Facebook will also restrict their kids’ usage. Also, most of our parent-friends were clueless that the age restriction was tied to Federal Law and explicitly stated in the Facebook user agreement. If you can’t find common ground though, don’t back down and don’t compromise. After all it is the safety of your kids that is at stake.


So, now that we have this Facebook dilemma figured out – whose going to help me figure out how to talk to my kids about “you know what,” when they could start dating, and when they can go see an “R” rated movie without me tagging along. Somebody Help Me. Please.


Nobody said it was easy — No one ever said it would be so hard.


Read more about Social Media on PC Pop with Pablo:


References & Resources for Parents, Teachers, and Families:


NetSmartz Workshop is an interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline. The program is designed for children ages 5-17, parents and guardians, educators, and law enforcement. With resources such as videos, games, activity cards, and presentations, NetSmartz entertains while it educates.


OnGuardOnline.gov is the federal government’s website to help you be safe, secure and responsible online. The Federal Trade Commission manages OnGuardOnline.gov, in partnership with several other federal agencies. OnGuardOnline.gov is a partner in the Stop Think Connect campaign, led by the Department of Homeland Security, and part of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education, led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


Common Sense Media is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology. We exist because our nation’s children spend more time with media and digital activities than they do with their families or in school, which profoundly impacts their social, emotional, and physical development. As a non-partisan, not-for-profit organization, we provide trustworthy information and tools, as well as an independent forum, so that families can have a choice and a voice about the media they consume.


Kids Using Social Media – A Guide for Families and Educators

In Children, Education, Facebook, Family, Malavenda, marketing, parenting, social media, Uncategorized on September 18, 2012 at 8:41 pm


Since the launch of Facebook in 2004, I have been studying the impact of individuals’ Social Media choices on their lives. I have seen time and time again individuals who insist on posting inappropriate content online using Facebook and other social networks. These choices cause problems, anxiety and often severe and irreversible consequences.

In 2005, my focus was on educating college students and college administrators. Facebook was such a new and mysterious internet phenomenon, I was kept very busy working with student athletes, coaches, campus officials in the dean’s office, top administrators, campus police, media relations staff as well as religious leaders and student leaders.

In 2010, there was a shocking increase in the number of middle school and elementary school students joining Facebook despite the age restriction. (Facebook requires that members be at least 13 years old to register.) My kids were in elementary school at the time, and I went on a crusade to get the word out to teachers and parents. As I started to give Social Media lectures and workshops I realized how ignorant most parents and teachers were to the potential dangers and pitfalls of social media and networking.

Today, the problem still exists only the technology is getting more and more advanced, parents and getting worn down, teachers are getting desperate, and the kids are getting more persistent and savvier. So, I am taking my crusade to the place where everyone is and wants to be – the internet.


Families & Parents

Many parents in this generation are intimately involved in all aspects of their kids’ lives and want them to have everything – including the latest cellphone, unlimited texting, and a Facebook profile. A majority of the kids who were altering the “birth year” to gain a Facebook profile had their parents’ consent and in many cases had their parents’ help with the registration process. Parents want the latest gadget for their kids but don’t even know it’s bad. And the pressure is on to equip your kids as well as your neighbor’s kids. Yes, peer pressure exists among parents too. Families must become engaged in social media in order to understand and to help their kids to avoid the pitfalls and navigate the dangers.



Teachers

Teachers on the other hand know the potential dangers when kids use Facebook but most teachers simply don’t know enough about technology to assist the kids or the parents. Teachers have a great deal of training and experience in how to deal with bad behavior but no one prepared them for this. Technology has added a new troubling dimension to student behavior issues. Every issue teachers have been dealing with for decades are still prevalent but with a new twist. Teachers know it’s bad – but get stuck there. Teachers must focus not on where the behavior is occurring but rather on the behavior itself. Whether the incident happens on the playground or on Facebook, the approach should be the same and the discipline, if necessary, should be consistent. Educators will then realize that they already know how to handle this online behavior and already have the resources to combat it. Educators should trust their instincts and rely on their training and experience to proactively work on educating kids on the pitfalls and giving parents the tools to do the same. But they must also be prepared to react swiftly, fairly and firmly, when needed.



Kids

The kids are going to take what they can from their parents – who want to give them everything. Kids will do their best to be safe but will eventually make a mistake. Let’s hope the consequences aren’t too damaging. There’s a reason they don’t have middle school dances at night – and they don’t have them at all in elementary school. Tweens do not have the skills to deal with complex relationships. Elementary school kids aren’t even ready for simple relationships let alone complex ones. Children are just not ready – developmentally – for the skills needed to use Facebook and other social media without getting hurt in some way.  Through my experience I know that social networking environments like Facebook are difficult for adult and college-age students; therefore, it will be impossible for teens, tweens and juveniles to avoid trouble. This new technology has far worse consequences though.  The danger is real, the harm is severe and the results can be permanent and irreversible.



Educating Kids

First, parents and teachers must partner together. The solution is not to ban young adults from using the internet but to make choices as a family – as a community.  For instance, like with PG-13 and R-rated movies we must have conversations with our kids about what’s appropriate, what the boundaries will be and why. Once kids are old enough they must be educated, trained and coached. Parents and teachers must expect mistakes and be supportive and understanding while correcting behavior immediately, equitably, and consistently. Social media is not going away. The best gift we may give our kids is the street-smarts to navigate this new medium successfully.



I plan on posting a series of blogs discussing the issues with kids using social media. My goal is to educate families, school personnel and students on some of the pitfalls. For now I will offer a short list of some of the potential issues with using Social Media for young adults and children. Ponder these and stayed tuned for more.



Now – if you choose to and allow your kids to go online – enter at your own risk – Godspeed.



Glossary of Internet Acronyms:

  • ASL = Age, Sex, Location?
  • BRB = Be Right Back
  • G2G = Got To Go
  • MIRL = (Let’s) Meet in Real Life
  • OMG = Oh My God/Gosh
  • POS = Parent Over Shoulder
  • P911 = Parent Alert
  • TMI = Too Much Information

A complete list of Top 50 Internet Acronyms Parents Need to Know


Read more about Social Media on PC Pop with Pablo:


References & Resources for Teachers, Parents, and Families:


NetSmartz Workshop is an interactive, educational program of the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children® (NCMEC) that provides age-appropriate resources to help teach children how to be safer on- and offline. The program is designed for children ages 5-17, parents and guardians, educators, and law enforcement. With resources such as videos, games, activity cards, and presentations, NetSmartz entertains while it educates.


OnGuardOnline.gov is the federal government’s website to help you be safe, secure and responsible online. The Federal Trade Commission manages OnGuardOnline.gov, in partnership with several other federal agencies. OnGuardOnline.gov is a partner in the Stop Think Connect campaign, led by the Department of Homeland Security, and part of the National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education, led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.


Common Sense Media is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology. We exist because our nation’s children spend more time with media and digital activities than they do with their families or in school, which profoundly impacts their social, emotional, and physical development. As a non-partisan, not-for-profit organization, we provide trustworthy information and tools, as well as an independent forum, so that families can have a choice and a voice about the media they consume.